Designing

Frågor och diskussion rörande utformning och HF-teorier

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Lars-Ola
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Iteration is not design

Post by Lars-Ola » 2017-Apr-07 17:50

Iteration is not design

https://medium.com/the-design-innovator ... 8695445f76

In some reaches of the product development world there is a fascination with the idea that products can nearly design themselves through an iterative process of development, testing, and incremental improvement. This is what I call “design Darwinism.” Design Darwinism often enters the product development conversation as an extension of a Lean, Agile, data-driven, or A/B testing framework.

The prospect of great products arising out of a primordial soup of nebulous product ideas and gradually evolving into great products without the need of designers is a stirring notion for some. The problem is, it doesn’t work. You can’t design by iteration and incremental improvement. There is no such thing as design Darwinism in the real world (except that which brings about the extinction of poorly-designed products).

Lars-Ola
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Probability: A UX Designer’s Second-Best Friend

Post by Lars-Ola » 2016-Mar-20 22:22

Probability: A UX Designer’s Second-Best Friend

https://uxmag.com/articles/probability- ... est-friend

In UX design, applying a solid sense of probability often determines whether we come out ahead or behind. So, if a solid command of the facts is a UX designer’s best friend, then a solid sense of probability is our second-best friend.

Lars-Ola
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Can Simplicity Be Used To Manipulate Us?

Post by Lars-Ola » 2016-Mar-20 22:20

Can Simplicity Be Used To Manipulate Us?

https://medium.com/the-coffeelicious/ca ... .kb3wr2eu4

Simplicity is now something we expect from design. Everything should be clear, obvious, intuitive — in other words, we should not have to think very hard.

For the most part, this is a good thing. We don’t want to have to think about every small thing everyday — like whether to push or pull a door, it should be obvious!

Making a product with a steep learning curve is a great way to discourage people. Making it intuitive allows people to free their minds to deal with more important subjects, like the weather and last nights football game.

But this need for simplicity can go too far, and in fact takes advantage of a cognitive bias that exists in all of us — thinking is painful.

Lars-Ola
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How Apple Is Giving Design A Bad Name

Post by Lars-Ola » 2015-Dec-03 08:49

How Apple Is Giving Design A Bad Name

http://www.fastcodesign.com/3053406/how ... a-bad-name

Once upon a time, Apple was known for designing easy-to-use, easy-to-understand products. It was a champion of the graphical user interface, where it is always possible to discover what actions are possible, clearly see how to select that action, receive unambiguous feedback as to the results of that action, and have the power to reverse that action—to undo it—if the result is not what was intended.

No more. Now, although the products are indeed even more beautiful than before, that beauty has come at a great price. Gone are the fundamental principles of good design: discoverability, feedback, recovery, and so on. Instead, Apple has, in striving for beauty, created fonts that are so small or thin, coupled with low contrast, that they are difficult or impossible for many people with normal vision to read. We have obscure gestures that are beyond even the developer’s ability to remember. We have great features that most people don’t realize exist.

Lars-Ola
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Extraordinarily Radical Redesign Strategies

Post by Lars-Ola » 2015-May-04 22:53

Extraordinarily Radical Redesign Strategies

http://www.uie.com/articles/radical_redesign/

The big box retailer had spent $100,000,000 on the redesign effort. That’s right. One hundred million dollars on redesigning their e-commerce site.

The day they flipped the switch and launched the new site, sales dropped by 20%. (This was a site that was doing almost $1 billion in revenues per year, so 20% is a lot of money to lose.)

It took the company three and a half years to get sales back to where they were the day before the launch. That’s what $100,000,000 buys you. Imagine what they could’ve gotten had they only spent $50,000,000.

Lars-Ola
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The Tyranny of the Minimum Viable Product

Post by Lars-Ola » 2015-Apr-26 11:51

The Tyranny of the Minimum Viable Product

https://medium.com/@jonhpittman/the-tyr ... 25e2e57e6e

I am the victim of Minimum Viable Product mentality. Minimum Viable Product (MVP) is a product development methodology popular with start-ups to focus a product on the minimum viable feature that will appeal to a customer. Unfortunately, engineering and business culture often focus on minimum features and forgets the viability part. This results in products that are unstable, unusable, and just plain unacceptable.

Lars-Ola
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Persuasive Design

Post by Lars-Ola » 2015-Apr-19 22:55

Persuasive Design

http://ergonomicsindesign.com/2015/04/p ... ve-design/

We are getting better and better at persuasive design. For the uninitiated, persuasive design is the practice of specifically crafting designs calculated to induce the user to engage in a specific behavior. On the surface, that seems pretty harmless. It may even sound like what all user interface design is intended to accomplish. But there is a difference that makes all the difference.

Lars-Ola
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How Designers Can Improve Health Care for Everyone

Post by Lars-Ola » 2015-Mar-09 00:18

How Designers Can Improve Health Care for Everyone

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/gue ... -everyone/

Nothing is more important in health care than creating efficient, seamless, and (dare I say it?) enjoyable interactions between humans and systems. The world of health care is still 90 percent human. Nurses, doctors, medical staff and patients are just a few of the people that make up this huge, breathing system. These users need systems that can be navigated smoothly even as they make mistakes, allow emotions to affect their decisions, and act in ways that are against their best interests (cigarette, anyone?). Health care needs to work for real people, not robots. Designers understand the differences between the two and can craft experiences that function with humans, not in spite of them.

Lars-Ola
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Finding New Solutions in Old Philosophy

Post by Lars-Ola » 2014-Nov-06 09:44

Finding New Solutions in Old Philosophy

http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/finding ... hilosophy/

Since completing my doctorate in philosophy, I have been a professional programmer for more than twenty years, and I have learned a lot about applying philosophical thinking to design and development. Philosophy offers deep and profound insights about subjects like knowledge, meaning and justice. Insofar as computer programs concern these subjects, philosophy can be a fantastic source of ideas – and often is. Reading philosophy books has given me ideas for writing useful computer programs that span multiple industries, from healthcare to business, which contradicts Wittgenstein’s belief. After all, if philosophy can guide the design of profitable products, it must be meaningful.

Lars-Ola
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Evolutionary Design and the Ability to Recognize Key Resourc

Post by Lars-Ola » 2014-Oct-22 21:42

Evolutionary Design and the Ability to Recognize Key Resources

http://ergonomicsindesign.com/2014/10/e ... resources/

I am not sure if this research with seem so obvious to you that you skip over it, but since so many things in motivational psychology are counterintuitive I thought I should share one of those great examples where things just make sense.

Question: If our ancient ancestors were driven by the need for food, what is an important skill for them to have?
Answer: the ability to recognize food and differentiate it from things that are not food (especially those berries our moms warned us about that look good but are poisonous).

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